The Great Big Book of Feelings

(2 reviews with an average rating of 5 out of 5)

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

Review

How are you feeling today? Happy? Sad? Exited? Bored? Interested? Angry? Upset?

Spread by spread, this warm-hearted and entertaining picture book explores a whole range of different feelings and emotions that children might experience - from loneliness and fear to silliness and happiness - in both family and school settings. The final page, 'Feeling Better', encourages children to think about and share how they feel.Mary Hoffman's simple, sensitive text provides an engaging way into thinking and talking about our feelings, whilst Ros Asquith's wild and witty illustrations brilliantly convey each of the different emotions discussed. Young readers can be encouraged to enjoy the fun of trying to spot the yellow striped cat who appears in each spread, bringing his own perspective to each of the feelings being explored. This is a book which could be particularly useful for children who struggle with understanding or dealing with human behaviour and emotions, but also of course has enormous universal appeal.

Like the award-winning The Great Big Book of Families, the lively illustrations in this book represent a true celebration of diversity. As well as being wonderfully ethnically diverse, the inclusive cast features children with wheelchairs and walkers and glasses for visual impairments such as Amblyopia. Asquith’s inclusive approach is casual, convincing and never contrived.

This thoughtful, engaging and inclusive book is ideal for primary schools and libraries, as well as for reading at home.

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