Authors' tips

Looking for some advice before putting pen to paper? Here are some great writing tips from some great writers.

In this section you can find advice on writing your own book blog, simple rules for improving your work and even some brilliant pointers on getting started with horror...

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Three simple rules to becoming a better writer, by Geoff Rodkey

The Tapper Twins author Geoff Rodkey offers his three big rules that he promises will help you to improve your writing.

How to start a book blog

Blogger and author Luisa Plaja shares her top ten tips for writing your very own book blog.

Start a summer writing journal

Flirty Dancing author Jenny McLachlan offers some great ideas to get your summer writing journal started.

How to write horror

Ready to get spooky? Author Chris Priestley brings you his advice about writing horror stories.

Sarah McIntyre’s writing workshop: Making a Comics Jam

Writer and illustrator Sarah McIntyre shows you how to draw a sea monkey and takes you through running a fun comics jam in the classroom, step by step.

Writer in Residence

Every six months, BookTrust appoints a new Writer in Residence (or Writer-Illustrator in Residence) to write blogs, run competitions and give us their own unique perspective on the world of children's books.

Our current Writer-Illustrator in Residence is Sarah McIntyre, so find out what she's been up to for BookTrust here.

Find out more

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Advice for young writers

Get inspiration from Sarah J Maas

Sarah J Maas published her first novel online at the age of 16 - and now she has some great pointers to help you with your writing.

Writing historical fiction

Travel back in time

Fancy visiting the past in your writing? Cora Harrison can help you figure out the best way to do just that.

Write what matters to you

Malorie Blackman

My best piece of advice is to write what you care about. Write about something that thrills you or makes you intensely angry or afraid or happy or sad. Then those feelings will shine through in every word you write.

Malorie Blackman

Children's Laureate 2013-2015