Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015

Latest update 'The 2015 judging panel has been announced'

The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015 judging panel has been announced. It features broadcaster and journalist Rosie Goldsmith, literary translator Antonia Lloyd-Jones, translator and academic Richard Mansell, author Helen Oyeyemi and longstanding judge Boyd Tonkin, senior writer and columnist at The Independent.

 

The Prize, which celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2015, will honour the best work of fiction by a living author that has been translated into English from any other language and published in the United Kingdom in 2014.

 

The deadline for publishers to submit entries was Tuesday 16 September. A longlist of approximately 15 titles will be released in March, a shortlist of six will be announced in April and the winning author and translator will be awarded the £10,000 Prize in May.

 

Claire Shanahan, Head of Arts at Booktrust and non-voting Chair of Judges says:

In our times of Euro-politics and global climate change, books play an increasingly important role in our understanding of the world around us; the things that divide us and ultimately the things that unite us, that make us human. Having seen the quality of the submissions for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015, all published in 2014, the experienced panel of judges has some tough choices on their hands, but I am certain that together they will highlight to UK readers the very best books from around the world.

The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015 will honour the best work of fiction by a living author that has been translated into English from any other language and published in the United Kingdom in 2014.

 

The deadline for publishers to submit entries was Tuesday 16 September. The 2015 judging panel, which will be announced in due course, will select a longlist of approximately 15 titles, a shortlist of six and one winner. Uniquely, the Prize gives the winning author and translator equal status: each receives £5,000.

 

Stay up-to-date with the Prize on Twitter@Booktrust and #IFFP.

Judges

Rosie Goldsmith says:

I'm thrilled! As a journalist and literature-lover I've supported the IFFP for many years, so to judge it is a privilege and a pleasure - and I feel exhausted in advance! I am truly, deeply, madly looking forward to weeks of long reads and cups of tea, as well as some vigorous discussion with my excellent colleagues. At last I can indulge in what I love most: reading the best international fiction in English.

Antonia Lloyd-Jones says:

At last I have a brilliant excuse to devote my time to reading a large number of good books, instead of just accumulating them. As I'm always advising younger translators to read as much literature as they can that's either well written in, or well translated into English, here's my chance to practise what I preach. It's also the perfect opportunity to read books from countries whose literature I've never read before, which always feels like finding a whole new world.

Richard Mansell says:

The perception of translated literature and the work of translators has undergone a massive shift in recent years, and initiatives like the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize have had a huge role in raising the profile of work from abroad. That's why I'm excited to take part in the prize at such an important time for translation.

Helen Oyeyemi says:

My favourite books don't have that much in common aside from what I'll just call personality; sometimes that's to do with style and sometimes that's to do with a text seeming to respond to being read in real time. The only real way to be sure I get to read as many of these books as possible is to learn every language currently in literary use. But then there'd be no time to read. So judging this prize is my best chance for this upcoming year.

Boyd Tonkins says:

More than ever, we need to read around the world in order to understand an ever-more inter-connected society.  Over many years, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize has established itself as the channel that guides British readers to the most exciting and illuminating fiction being written across the globe - and the award that honours the translators who carry it home to us. I'm delighted to set out on another voyage of discovery in the company of my fellow-judges. Rest assured that once more we will bring back treasures.

  • Boyd Tonkin

    Senior Writer and Columnist

About the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015

The annual Prize honours the best work of fiction by a living author, which has been translated into English from any other language and published in the United Kingdom in the previous year. Uniquely, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize gives the winning author and translator equal status - each receives £5,000 - recognising the importance of the translator in their ability to bridge the gap between languages and culture.


First awarded in 1990 to Orhan Pamuk and translator Victoria Holbrook for The White Castle, the Prize ran until 1995. It was then revived in 2001 with the support of Arts Council England and is now managed by Booktrust. The £10,000 Prize money and associated costs are supported using public funding by Arts Council England. The Prize is also supported by The Independent and Champagne Taittinger.

 

Previous Winners 

 

  • 2014 The Iraqi Christ written by Hassan Blasim, translated from Arabic by Jonathan Wright (Comma Press)
  • 2013 The Detour written by Gerbrand Bakker, translated from Dutch by David Colmer (Harvill Secker)
  • 2012 Blooms of Darkness written by Aharon Appelfeld, translated from Hebrew by Jeffrey M Green (Alma Books)
  • 2011 Red April written by Santiago Roncagliolo, translated from Spanish by Edith Grossman (Atlantic Books)
  • 2010 Brodeck's Report written by Philippe Claudel,  translated from French by John Cullen (MacLehose Press)
  • 2009 The Armies written by Evelio Rosero, translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean (MacLehose Press)
  • 2008 Omega Minor written by Paul Verhaeghen, translated from Dutch by the author (Dalkey Archive Press)
  • 2007 The Book of Chameleons written by José Eduardo Agualusa, translated from Portuguese by Daniel Hahan (Simon & Schuster)
  • 2006 Out Stealing Horses written by Per Petterson, translated from the Norwegian by Anne Born (Harvill Secker)
  • 2005 Windows on the World written by Frédéric Beigbeder, translated from the French by Frank Wynne (HarperCollins)
  • 2004 Soldiers of Salamina written by Javier Cercas, translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean (Bloomsbury)
  • 2003 The Visit of the Royal Physician written by Per Olov Enquist, from the Swedish by Tiina Nunnally (Harvill Press)
  • 2002 Austerlitz written by W G Sebald, translated from the German by Anthea Bell (Penguin). Prize won by Sebald (posthumously).
  • 1996-2001 Prize in abeyance
  • 1995 The Film Explainer written by Gert Hofmann,  translated from German by Michael Hofmann (Secker)
  • 1994 The Sorrow of War written by Bao Ninh, translated from Vietnamese by Phanh Thanh Hao (Harvill Press)
  • 1993 The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis written by José Saramago, translated from Portuguese by Giovanni Pontiero (Harvill Press)
  • 1992 The Death Of Napoleon written by Simon Leys, translated from French by Patricia Clancy (Quartet Books)
  • 1991 Immortality written by Milan Kundera, translated from Czech by Peter Kussi (Faber & Faber)
  • 1990 The White Castle written by Orhan Pamuk, translated from Turkish by Victoria Holbrook (Carcanet)


The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015 invited publishers to submit entries from 8 August to 16 September 2014. For reference please view the Terms & Conditions.

 

Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015 Terms and Conditions

 

If you have any queries please email iffp@booktrust.org.uk or call Hannah Davies on 020 8875 4838