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Prize-winning books to read from 2017

Bronze and Sunflower

Excitingly, there are loads of big book prizes that celebrate the serious talent among authors writing for children, tweens, teens and young adults. 

As ever, this year's award-winning list is packed full with fabulous books that we absolutely recommend for your child.

We've gathered them all together in one handy round-up. The majority of awards were in 2017, but there are a couple from the tail end of 2016, so you don't miss out.

Let us know what would win the award for your favourite children's book of the year @BookTrust

  • Ada Twist, Scientist

    Andrea Beaty, Illustrated by David Roberts
    Abrams

    A brilliant and beautiful rhyming book about supporting your child's curiosity, and taking inspiration from Ada Lovelace (the pioneer mathematician and programmer), this is an inspirational and entertaining read.

  • An Eagle in the Snow

    Michael Morpurgo Illustrated by Michael Foreman
    HarperCollins

    Stuck on a train, a boy listens to a stranger’s story about one moment that could have stopped World War II. A thought-provoking story that young history enthusiasts will especially welcome.

  • Beetle Boy

    MG Leonard
    Chicken House

    When Darkus' father mysteriously disappears from London’s Natural History Museum, Darkus has to move in with his rather odd Uncle Max AND change schools. A wonderfully funny and engaging book, perfect for fans of Roald Dahl.

  • Bronze and Sunflower

    Cao Wenxuan, illustrated by Meilo So, translated by Helen Wang
    Walker Books

    A classic, heartwarming tale set to the backdrop of the Chinese cultural revolution, with the timeless feels of Eva Ibbotson's Journey to the River Sea.

  • Crongton Knights

    Alex Wheatle
    Atom

    McKay's life on the South Crongton Estate is rough. His Mum has died, his Dad works all hours of the day to keep away the Bailiffs, and his brother is always out looking for trouble.

  • Moon Juice: Poems for Children

    Kate Wakeling, illustrated by Elina Braslina
    The Emma Press

    Kate Wakeling's first book of poems for children is full of curious characters and strange situations. The poems she writes are always musical, sometimes wistful, and full of wonder.

  • Oi Dog!

    Kes Gray Illustrator Jim Field
    Hodder Children's Books

    Frog has had enough of being sat on. This time, dogs will not sit on frogs - they will sit on logs, which is where they belong. Cats will sit on gnats, bears will sit on stairs and whales will sit on nails. This a side-splitting book, which is great for sharing.

  • One

    Sarah Crossan
    Bloomsbury

    This is a book that goes straight into your heart and once it is there, won't leave. One is a brilliant, beautiful, and heart-wrenching novel that is not to be missed.

  • Podkin One Ear

    Kieran Larwood, Illustrated by David Wyatt
    Faber and Faber

    A mysterious storyteller rolls in from the snow one night and enchants a warren of young rabbits with the tale of Podkin One Ear: the son of a chieftain who went on to become a legend. A family read that already feels like a classic.

  • Salt to the Sea

    Ruta Sepetys
    Puffin

    A group of children flee the war in Germany, each with a secret to hide and a painful past to bear. This book is brilliantly written and tremendously sad, showing the perspective of very different characters.

  • Shark in the Park on a Windy Day!

    Nick Sharratt
    Picture Corgi

    Timothy Pope spots all sorts of things through his telescope, but are they really sharks? A delightful Sharratt peep-hole picturebook for toddlers and pre-schoolers to explore the action and join in.

  • Survivors

    David Long, Illustrated by Kerry Hyndman
    Faber and Faber

    An anthology to inspire and help children understand how far self-belief and guts took adventurers from the past - and to wonder how far these qualities could take them too. Includes stunning illustrations.

  • The Bone Sparrow

    Zana Fraillon
    Orion Children’s Books

    Focusing on a friendship between two young refugees, The Bone Sparrow is one of those rare, special books that will break your heart with its honesty and beauty - but is ultimately hopeful and uplifting.

  • The Girl of Ink and Stars

    Kiran Millwood Hargrave
    Chicken House

    When her closest friend disappears into the island's Forgotten Territories, Isabella Riosse volunteers to guide the search. A stunning debut, full of myth, magic and mapmaking.

  • The Journey

    Francesca Sanna
    Flying Eye Books

    What is it like to leave everything behind and travel somewhere strange? This incredibly poignant story introduces the concept of refugees with straightforward language, tackling this difficult subject with truth, clarity and strikingly beautiful illustrations.

  • The Reluctant Journal of Henry K Larsen

    Susin Nielsen
    Andersen Press

    Nielsen tackles a hugely difficult subject with a deceptive lightness of touch. Henry’s life will never be the same, but day by day, he can begin to live again. A terrific, sad, beautiful and essential read.

  • There Is a Tribe of Kids

    Lane Smith
    Two Hoots

    A little boy spends a day finding different groups of things: a pod of whales, an unkindness of ravens, a formation of rocks. However, even the stars have a family, and the boy might be feeling just a tiny bit lonely. Where are the other kids?

  • Where’s Mr Lion?

    Ingela Arrhenius
    Nosy Crow

    Five beautifully illustrated spreads show a series of friendly savannah animals hiding behind bright felt flaps. You're in for a treat on the final page too.... There's a mirror!