Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2013

Latest update 'IFFP joins forces with annual Man Booker International Prize'
The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize is evolving to encourage more publishing and reading of quality fiction in translation. It will join forces with the Booker Prize Foundation to become the annual Man Booker International Prize, and it will be managed by Four Colman Getty. 
 
Diana Gerald, Book Trust's chief executive comments:

We are delighted by the additional investment in literature in translation that this announcement heralds. Joining forces with the Man Booker International Prize will take the prize to the next level, helping to raise the profile of translated literature and reflecting the impact of the IFFP. This is good news for writers, translators and readers.

As an acknowledgement of the importance of translation, the £50,000 prize money will be divided equally between the author and the translator. Each shortlisted author and translator will receive £1,000. This brings the total prize fund to £60,000 per year, compared to the previous £37,500 for the Man Booker International Prize and £10,000 for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.
 
The terms and conditions of entry for the new Man Booker International Prize are grounded in those of the IFFP, bringing the best of the IFFP to the new venture. Boyd Tonkin, senior writer on The Independent, who has been on the judging panel for and a champion of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize since 2000, will chair the judges of the 2016 Man Booker International Prize.

The Independent Foreign Prize honours the best work of fiction by a living author, which has been translated into English from any other language and published in the United Kingdom. Uniquely, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize gives the winning author and translator equal status: each receives £5,000.

Independent Foreign Fiction Prize Readers Day

 

Upcoming we have our 18 May Readers Day where reading groups across the country will be convening at the Free Word Centre to host a series of discussions around this year's shortlist. The day will include talks from judges, authors and translators, discussions of the individual titles, a workshop with English Pen, a translation duel and the announcement of the Readers' Choice winner.

 

We have put together this downloadable booklet of all the shortlist for the day. You can download it here, especially if you're looking for your next book recommendation.

 

You can also download our Readers Day guide here

 

Read some of the reviews on The Reading Agency site

  • Winner

    The Detour

    Gerbrand Bakker

    Translated from the Dutch by David Colmer

    Harvill Secker

    A Dutch woman rents a remote farm in rural Wales. She says her name is Emilie. She is a lecturer doing some research, and sets about making the farmhouse more homely. When she arrives there are ten geese living in the garden but one by one they disappear. Perhaps it's the work of a local fox. She has fled from an unbearable situation having recently confessed to an affair with one of her students. In Amsterdam, her stunned husband forms a strange partnership with a detective who agrees to help him trace her. They board the ferry to Hull on Christmas Eve. Back on the farm, a young man out walking with his dog injures himself and stays the night, then ends up staying longer. Yet something is deeply wrong. Does he know what he is getting himself into? And what will happen when her husband and the policeman arrive? Gerbrand Bakker has made the territories of isolation, inner turmoil and the solace offered by the natural world his own. The Detour is a deeply moving new novel, shot through with longing and the quiet tragedy of everyday lives.

IMPAC Dublin Literary Award winner Gerbrand Bakker wins the £10,000 prize with latest novel The Detour

Dutch tale The Detour has been announced as the winner of the 2013 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, at an awards ceremony sponsored by Tattinger in London, tonight, 20th May 2013. Themes of infidelity, exile and isolation won over the judges of this year’s Prize to give the author his second major prize win. His previous novel The Twin won the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Translator David Colmer will share the prize money with Bakker, in this unique award that recognises writer and translator equally.

The Detour follows Emilie, a translation professor and Emily Dickinson scholar, who retreats from her life in the Netherlands to an isolated farm house in Wales following an affair with a student. A young man hiking past the farmhouse with his dog stays for a night but ends up remaining longer, helping the woman to make repairs to the farmhouse and easing her self-imposed loneliness. But back in Amsterdam her husband forms a bond with a detective who agrees to help him find his wife. Something is deeply wrong at the farmhouse – and what will happen when the husband and detective finally track Emilie down?

Judge and literary editor of the Independent, Boyd Tonkin said of the winner:
'Swift-moving and apparently straightforward, but with mysterious hidden depths, The Detour is a novel that grips its reader tight and never lets go. Gerbrand Bakker’s tale of a Dutchwoman who goes missing from her own troubled life and seeks refuge in rural Wales combines mesmeric storytelling with an uncanny sense of place, and an atmosphere of brooding, irresistible menace. In David Colmer’s pitch-perfect and immersive translation, this book will both linger in your imagination and, quite possibly, haunt your dreams as well.'

Also given a special mention as a very close contender for this year’s Prize was Traveller of the Century by Andrés Neuman, translated by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia. The book has at its heart a secret affair between two translators, who between bed and the dictionary build their own fragile language. An epic novel of philosophy, history and love, this is the fourth novel by Andrés Neuman who was named as one of Granta’s Best Young Spanish Language Novelists in 2010.

Bakker fought off strong competition from a prestigious shortlist including Man Booker International Prize Winner Ismail Kadare from Albania. Also shortlisted were Croatian author Daša Drndić, Chris Barnard from South Africa and Enrique Vila-Matas from Spain. Vila-Matas’ novel Dublinesque was translated together by Rosalind Harvey and Anne McLean, who has previously won the IFFP twice and had a second title longlisted for the Prize this year, The Sound of Things Falling by Juan Gabriel Vasquez.

This year, Booktrust, who manages the Prize, piloted a Readers’ Project, with 300 Readers shadowing the six shortlisted titles. The readers gathered together at the Free Word Centre in Farringdon on 18 May for a mini-festival, featuring a talk from author Elif Shafak, a translation duel, a Google Hangout with the shortlisted authors and translators, and a vote on their favourite title, crowned the Independent Foreign Fiction Readers’ Prize (IFFRP) winner. The Readers’ Project is funded by the Free Word Strategic Commissioning Fund and the NALD Futures Fund (administered by Writers’ Centre Norwich). English PEN, the Reading Agency and the British Centre for Literary Translation are partnering on the project with Booktrust. A bespoke piece of research will provide a detailed study of the barriers to readers’ engagement with world literature and make recommendations for the trade to overcome them. The research will be promoted nationally and internationally in the second half of 2013.

About the shortlist

Andrés Neuman adds some fire to this year's Independent Foreign Fiction Prize Shortlist with his epic novel Traveller of the Century, which explores an affair between the hearts, minds and bodies of two literary translators. Together they build a language of understanding as they work to translate European poetry, whilst continuing a secret sexual relationship, leading them to ask if translation itself is an act of love. The full shortlist sees diverse themes of history, war and love battling it out for the £10,000 Prize, to be announced on 20 May.

 

The prestigious shortlist features authors from Africa, Spain, The Netherlands, Argentina, Croatia and from Albania, the winner of the inaugural Man Booker International Prize, Ismail Kadare. Both Kadare's story The Fall of the Stone City and Croatian author Daša Drndić's Trieste, explore the tension and horror of Nazi encounters and their after-effects. Meanwhile love is questioned in Dutch story The Detour, by Gerbrand Bakker, which follows an unfaithful wife who has exiled herself to an isolated farm in Wales, leaving her husband to hire a private detective to trace her. Also on the shortlist is a story of the people and animals of Africa, and the limitations they share in Chris Barnard's Bundu. Completing the line-up, Dublinesque sees a Spanish publisher travel to Dublin to hold a funeral for the age of print and honour James Joyce on Bloomsday. Penned by Enrique Vila-Matas, Dublinesque was translated by Rosalind Harvey and Anne McLean, who has won the IFFP twice previously.  

 

Judge and award-winning novelist Elif Shafak said:

In a world where a deeper cross-cultural understanding is a rarity and literature in translation is still not generating the interest it deserves, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize swims against the tide. Right from the beginning it was a beautiful challenge to be on the judging panel. Our shortlist reflects a mesmerizing diversity of styles, genres and languages around the globe. What is common in all is the mellifluousness of the writing and the translation together, a boundless imagination, an eloquent prose and the ability to reach out to people across boundaries-be it national, religious, class or sexual.

The judges on the shortlist

Boyd Tonkin on Bundu

 

Compact, colourful, freighted with great issues but written (and translated) with pace and grace, Bundu should introduce UK readers to a giant of South African fiction. A playwright, song- and screenwriter as well as novelist, Chris Barnard helped lead the Sixties revival of literature in Afrikaans. His latest novel sketches a limbo-land between South Africa and Mozambique, where a researcher into baboon behaviour finds a very human crisis on his drought-stricken doorstep as desperate refugees cross the border. Swift-moving but enigmatic, the ensuing action may feel closer to the frontier fables of a J M Coetzee than the bush yarns of a Wilbur Smith. Nonetheless, Barnard's ideas-rich adventure, superbly served by translator Michiel Heyns, excites as much as it challenges the reader.

 

Jean Boase-Beier on The Detour

 

This is an apparently simple tale of a woman who goes to live in an isolated cottage in Wales. But there is an unsettling sense of impending doom. Why is she here? What will happen to her? The story is deeply involving, the dialogue utterly convincing, the translation near perfect. Unpretentious, restrained and profound, The Detour is everything a novel should be.

 

Gabriel Josipovici on Dublinesque

 

A comic book that is both serious and profound is rare enough these days to be a cause for celebration.  Combining the celebration of the trivial and the ordinary that we find in Schwitters or Perec with the hint of  mad tongue-in-cheek apocalypse  that we find in  Duchamp and Bernhard, Vila-Matas' Dublinesque is nonetheless imbued with its own distinct aura: that of a world becalmed after the storms that beset culture and the arts in the course of the twentieth century. The question at its heart is whether that calm is a sign of peace come at last or of the absence of any life-giving wind. It is a question that haunts us all.

 

Frank Wynne on The Fall of the Stone City

 

With biting wit and a bleak pathos, this tale of two doctors cursed with the same name becomes a palimpsest of the history of Albania. The lightness and wry humour of Kadare's tale of tyranny and torture makes the fate of the characters - nebulous ciphers, ghosts and doppelgängers - all the more devastating. In John Hodgson's limpid and lyrical translation captures Kadare's deft interweaving of history and myth in this hallucinatory fable where dream and reality blur and language refashions history which, with each retelling, grows darker and more brutal while truth remains ineffable.

 

Elif Shafak on Traveller of the Century

 

Hans, a young traveller and translator, arrives at Wandernburg-a small town in post-Napoleonic Germany that feels equally mundane and magical. There is a familiarity and a surrealness about every street he crosses, each person he meets from then on, as though we, the readers, recognize this place from another life. Very few novels in world literature can build up an atmosphere as deftly and convincingly as the Traveller of the Century has done. This is a wonderful novel of ideas. It is a story of love, loneliness and journeys, spiritual and intellectual. Andres Neuman's story will envelop you like a morning fog and when you have finished reading, when the fog dissolves, you might see the world differently. Every year hundreds of books are published but rarely comes a book that reminds us of why we loved reading in the first place, that innermost quest for words and dreams. Traveller of the Century is a literary gem.

 

Frank Wynne on Trieste

 

From the red basket at her feet, Haya Tedeschi draws out a harrowing tale in aching memories, tattered photos, maps and heartrending litanies. At the heart of this audacious, fractured tale, the poignant search of a mother for the son abducted as part of the Lebensborn programme shimmers liked a flawed jewel. Ellen Elias-Bursac's luminous translation brings both pathos and veracity to the often disorienting blizzard of facts, of names and voices in Daša Drndić's documentary novel. Sprawling, terrifying and meticulously detailed, Trieste capturesthe true horror and confusion of war.

Shortlist

  • The Detour

    Gerbrand Bakker

    Translated from the Dutch by David Colmer

    Harvill Secker
  • Bundu

    Chris Barnard

    Translated from the Afrikaans by Michiel Heyns

    Alma Books
  • Trieste

    Daša Drndić

    Translated from the Croatian by Ellen Elias-Bursac

    MacLehose Press
  • The Fall of the Stone City

    Ismail Kadare

    Translated from the Albanian by John Hodgson

    Canongate
  • Traveller of the Century

    Andrés Neuman

    Translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia

    Pushkin Press
  • Dublinesque

    Enrique Vila-Matas

    Translated from the Spanish by Rosalind Harvey and Anne McLean

    Harvill Secker

Longlist

  • The Detour

    Gerbrand Bakker

    Translated from the Dutch by David Colmer

    Harvill Secker
  • Bundu

    Chris Barnard

    Translated from the Afrikaans by Michiel Heyns

    Alma Books
  • HHhH

    Laurence Binet

    Translated from the French by Sam Taylor

    Harvill Secker
  • Trieste

    Daša Drndić

    Translated from the Croatian by Ellen Elias-Bursac

    MacLehose Press
  • Cold Sea Stories

    Pawel Huelle

    Translated from the Polish by Antonia Lloyd-Jones

    Comma Press
  • The Murder of Halland

    Pia Juul

    Translated from the Danish by Martin Aitken

    Peirene Press
  • The Fall of the Stone City

    Ismail Kadare

    Translated from the Albanian by John Hodgson

    Canongate
  • In Praise of Hatred

    Khalid Khalifa

    Translated from the Arabic by Leri Price

    Transworld
  • A Death In the Family

    Karl Ove Knausgaard

    Translated from the Norweigian by Don Bartlett

    Harvill Secker
  • Satantango

    Laszlo Krasznahorkai

    Translated from the Hungarian by George Szirtes

    Tuskar Rock
  • Black Bazaar

    Alain Mabanckou

    Translated from the French by Sarah Ardizzone

    Serpent's Tail
  • The Last of the Vostyachs

    Diego Marani

    Translated from the Italian by Judith Landry

    Dedalus Books
  • Traveller of the Century

    Andrés Neuman

    Translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia

    Pushkin Press
  • Silent House

    Orhan Pamuk

    Translated from the original Turkish by Robert Finn

    Faber
  • The Sound of Things Falling

    Juan Gabriel Vásquez
    Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean

    Bloomsbury
  • Dublinesque

    Enrique Vila-Matas

    Translated from the Spanish by Rosalind Harvey and Anne McLean

    Harvill Secker

Biographies of authors and translators

A Death in the Family by Karl Ove Knausgard, translated from the Norwegian by Don Barlett

Karl Ove Knausgaard's first novel, Out of the World, was the first ever debut novel to win the Norweigan's Critics prize. His second novel, A Time to Every Purpose Under Heaven, was widely acclaimed. A Death in the Family was awarded the prestigious Brage Award, and is being heralded as a masterpiece wherever it appears.

 

A Death in the Family explores Karl Ove Knausgaard's childhood and teenage years and his bewilderment and grief on his father's death with painful honesty. When Karl Ove Knausgaard's becomes a father himself, he must balance the demands of caring for a young family with his determination to write great literature.

 

Don Barlett lives in Norfolk and works as a freelance translator of Scandinavian literature. He has translated, or co-translated, a wide variety of Danish and Norwegian novels by such writers as Per Petterson, Lars Saabye Christensen, Roy Jacobsen, Ingvar Ambjørnsen, Jo Nesbø and Ida Jessen.

 

Black Bazaar by Alain Mabanckou, translated from the French by Sarah Ardizzone

Alain Mabanckou is a writer of novels, plays and pertry. He teaches French literature at UCLA in Califorina. Prvious novels, African Psycho, Broken Glass and Memoirs of a Porcupine are also published by Serpent's Tail. He was awarded the Grand Prix de la Littérature in 2012.

 

 

Sarah Ardizzone is a translator from the French. Her authors include the young French-Algerian writer Faïza Guène, bande dessinée wunderkind Joann Sfar, indie rock star Mathias Malzieu and maverick thinker Daniel Pennac. She has a special interest in translating sharp dialogue, urban and migrant slang, and in what Alain Mabranckou calls 'a world literature in French'. Sarch appears regularly on the book festival and liver literature circuit, and curates educational programmes around translation, bilingualism and storytelling for all ages. Sarah has also worked as a travel writer, cultural critic, journalist, and literary festival director.

 

Bundu by Chris Barnard, translated from the Afrikaans by Michiel Heyns

Chris Barnard is one of the leading authors of Afrikaans literature. He has been active in almost every genre, having written novels, songs, plays and screenplays - including the script for Paljas, the first South African film to be nominated for an Oscar. After a career as a journalist, book publisher and film and TV producer, he now lives and writes on his farm outside Nelspruit.

 

 

Michiel Heyns was educated in South Africa and at Cambridge and lectured in English literature until recently. Now he is a fulltime writer and translator. He is author of: The Children's Day, The Reluctant Passenger, The Typewriter's Tale, Bodies Politic (winner of the Herman Charles Bosman Prize for English Fiction 2009), Lost Ground (winner of the Herman Charles Bosman Prize for English Fiction and the Sunday Times Fiction Prize 2012), Invisible Furies.

 

Cold Sea Stories by Pawel Huelle, translated from the Polish by Antonia Lloyd-Jones

Paweł Huelle spent his early writing career as an employee of the Solidarity Movement's press office in the late 1980s. He subsequently achieved great critical success (both domestically and in translation) as a writer of novels, short stories and essays, and has been honoured with numerous awards. His first novel, Who Was David Weiser? was described by critics in Poland as 'the book of the decade', 'a masterpiece' and 'a literary triumph' and elicited comparisons to Günter Grass and Bruno Schulz. Huelle followed this with Moving House and Other Stories, First Love and Other Stories, and then three novels, Mercedes BenzCastorp and The Last Supper . The novels were published in English translation by Serpent's Tale, with Mercedes Benz and Castorp both shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.

 

Antonia Lloyd-Jones is a full-time translator of Polish literature. Her published translations include fiction by several of Poland's leading contemporary novelists, including The Last Supper by Paweł Huelle, for which she won the Found in Translation Award 2008. Her most recent translations include Ryszard Kapuściński: A Life by Artur Domosławski (Verso), and A Grain of Truth by Zygmunt Miłoszewski (Bitter Lemon), a crime novel.  She also translates reportage, poetry, and books for children.

 

Dublinesque by Enrique Vila-Matas, translated from the Spanish by Rosalind Harvey and Anne McLean

Born in Barcelona in 1948, Enrique Vila-Matas is widely considered to be on of Spain's most important contemporary novelists, and Dublinesque has been declared his masterpiece. His extraordinary oeuvre, translated in 30 languages, includes Bartleby & Co, Montano, which was longlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and Never Any End to Paris, which was a finalist for the Best Translated Book Award.

 

Rosalind Harvey is a translator in residence at London's Free Word Centre. Her translation of Juan Villalobo's Down the Rabbit Hole was nominated for the Guardian First Book Award.

 

 

 

Anne McLean has translated Latin American and Spanish novels, short stories, memoirs and other writings by authors including Hector Abad, Carmen Martín Gaite, Julio Cortázar, Ignacio Martíner de Pisón, Enrique Vila-Matas and Tomás E;ry Martínez. She has won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize twice, for Soldiers of Salamis by Javier Cercas in 2004 and for The Armies by Evelio Rosero in 2009.

 

HHhH by Laurent Binet, translated from the French by Sam Taylor

HHhH is Laurent Binet's first novel.  He lives and works in France.  HHhH won the prestigious Prix Goncourt du premier roman and the Prix des Lecteurs du Livre de Poche.

 

 

 

Sam Taylor was born in Nottinghamshire. He is the author of three books of fiction, The Republic of Trees, The Amnesiac and The Island at the End of the World. HHhH is his first translation

 

In Praise of Hatred by Khalid Khalifa, translated from the Arabic by Leri Price

Khaled Khalifa was born in 1964, in a village close to Aleppo, Syria. He is the fifth child of a family of thirteen siblings. He studied law at Aleppo University and actively participated in the foundation of Aleph magazine with a group of writers and poets. A few months later, the magazine was closed down by Syrian censorship. He currently lives in Damascus where he writes scripts for cinema and television. In Praise of Hatred was Shortlisted for the Arabic 'Man Booker' prize.

 

Leri Price recently graduated from the University of Edinburgh with First Class Honours in Arabic. She is currently working on the translation of a novel by Muhammad Aladdin. She lives in Cairo.

 

Satantango by Laszlo Krasznahovkai, translated from the Hungarian by George Szirtes

Laszlo Krasznahovkai was born in 1954. Krasznahovkai has been honoured with numerous literary prizes, among them the highest award of the Hungarian state, the Kossuth Prize and in 1993, the German Bestenliste Prize for the best literary work of the year.

 

 

Born in Budapest in 1948 George Szirtes came to England with his family as a refugee in 1956. He has published some fourteen books of poetry and has won the Faber Prize, in 1980 for The Slant Door, and the T S Eliot Prizein 2004 for Reel. His last two books, including 2013's Bad Machine, have also been shortlisted for the TS Eliot Prize. He has been translating poetry and fiction from the Hungarian since 1984 when he first returned to Hungary.

 

Silent House by Orhan Pamuk, translated from the Turkish by Robert Finn

Orhan Pamuk, is the author of many celebrated books, including The White Castle, Istanbul and Snow. In 2003 he won the International IMPAC Award for My Name is Red, and in 2006 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. The Museum of Innocence, was an international bestseller, praised in the Guardian as 'an enthralling, immensely enjoyable piece of storytelling', while Silent House was shortlist for the 2012 Man Asian Literary Prize. Orhan Pamuk lives in Istanbul.

 

Ambassador Robert Finn is the author of the book The Early Turkish Novel, which has been published both in English and Turkish. His poems and translations have appeared in the United States, Turkey, France and Pakistan. The University of Texas press published his translation of the Turkish author Nazli Eray's novel, Orpheus in 2006. Syracuse University Press will publish his translation of Eray's The Emperor Tea Garden in 2013 and he is currently translating her novel Halfeti's Black Rose. He co-edited Building State and Security in Afghanistan. He has translated Nobel prize winner Orhan Pamuk's The Silent House and is now completing the translation of Pamuk's Cevdet Bey and Sons.

 

The Detour by Gerrband Bakker, translated from the Dutch by David Colmer

Gerbrand Bakker worked as a subtitler for nature films before becoming a gardener. His debut novel The Twin won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and will soon be made into a film.

 

 

 

David Colmer is an Australian writer and translator who lives in Amsterdam. He is the author of a novel and a collection of short stories, both published in Dutch translation in the Netherlands. His is the translator of more than twenty books: novels, children's literature and poetry.  He is a four-time winner of the David Reid Poetry Translation Prize and won the 2009 Biennial NSW Premier and PEN Translation Prize for his body of work. In 2010 his translation of Gerrband Bakker's The Twin won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.

 

The Fall of the Stone City by Ismail Kadare, translated from the Albanian by John Hodgson

Born in 1936, Ismail Kadare is Albania's best-known poet and novelist. Translations of his novels have appeared in more than 40 countries. In 2005 he was awarded the first Man Booker International Prize for 'a body of work written by an author who has had a truly global impact'. He is the recipient of the highly prestigious 2009 Principe de Asturias de las Letras in Spain.

 

 

John Hodgson studied English at Cambridge and Newcastle and has taught at universties in Kosovo and Albania.  He has also translated The Three-Arched Bridge and The Accident by Ismail Kadare.

 

The Last of the Vostyachs by Diego Marani, translated from the Italian by Judith Landry

Diego Marani was born in Ferrara in 1959.  He is a policy officer of the European Commission and lives in Brussels with his wife and two children.  He has invented his own European language, Europorita and has published seven novels in Italian including the prize winning New Finnish Grammar and The Last of the Vostyachs.

 

 

Judith Landry got a first in French and Italian from Somerville College, Oxford.  Her translations include three novels by Diego Marani including New Finnish Grammar, which won the 2012 Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize and was also shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.

 

The Murder of Halland by Pia Juul, translated from the Danish by Martin Aitken

Pia Juul, born 1962, claims her place as on of Denmarks' foremost literary authors. She has published five books of poetry, two short story collections and two novels. She is a member of the prestigious Danish Literary Academy. With sharp dialogue, finesse and humour bordering on the absurd, Juul has carved out a niche of her own in Scandinavian literature.The Murder of Halland was published in Danish in 2009 and is celebrated to huge critical acclaim as the renewal of the Danish crime novel. The novel has won Denmark's most important literary prize, Den Danske Banks litteraturpris. Juul is also the translator of Ali Smith, Sylvia Plath, Ted Hughes and Alain de Botton into Danish.

 

Martin Aitken was born in 1961 and holds PhD in Linguistics. He gave up university tenure in 2008 to translate literature and listen to The Fall. His work has appeared in book form (to date, seven titles published in Danish and English) as well as in countless literary journals and periodicals, including AGNI, New Letters, Apparatur, Ecotone, The Literary Review, A Public Space and the Boston Review. Translated works include titles by Jørgen Leth, Pia Juul, Per Kirkeby, and Peter Høeg. He lives and works in rurual Denmark.

 

The Sound of Things Falling by Juan Gabriel Vasquez, translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean

Juan Gabriel Vasquez was born in Bogotá in 1973. He studied Latin American literature at the Sorbonne and has translated works by E M Forster and Victor Hugo into Spanish.  He was nominated as one of the Bogotá 39, South America's most promising writers of the new generation. His novel The Informers was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.

 

Anne McLean has translated Latin American and Spanish novels, short stories, memoirs and other writings by authors including Hector Abad, Carmen Martín Gaite, Julio Cortázar, Ignacio Martíner de Pisón, Enrique Vila-Matas and Tomás Eloy Martínez.  She has won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize twice, for Soldiers of Salamis by Javier Cercas in 2004 and for The Armies by Evelio Rosero in 2009.

 

Traveller of the Century by Andrés Neuman, translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia

Andrés Neuman is novelist, poet, translator, journalist and clomunist. He was born in 1977 in Buenos Aires, but emigrated to Spain with his parents as a child. He now lives in Granada. He has a degree in Spanish philosophy from the University of Granada and has taught Latin American literature. Neuman published his first novel, Bariloch, at 22 and has since published further novels, several collections of short stories and poetry. He was named as one of Hay Festival's the Bogotá 39 and Granta has described him as one of the 22 best young Spanish-language novelists.

 

Nick Caistor is a translator, journalist and author.  He has translated over forty books from Spanish and Portuguese, including works by José Saramago and Manuel Vázquez Montalbán.

 

 

 

Lorenza Garcia has lived for extended periods in Spain, France and Iceland.  Since 2007 she has translated over a dozen novels and works of non-fiction from French and Spanish.

 

Trieste by Daša Drndic, translated from the Croatian by Ellen Elias-Bursac

Daša Drndic is a distinguished Croatian novelist, playwright and literary critic, born in Zagreb in 1946. She spent some years teaching in Canada and gained an MA in Theatre and Communication as part of the Fulbright Programme.

 

 

 

Ellen Elias-Bursac has been translating novels, stories and nonfiction by Bosnian, Coratian, and Serbian writers for last twenty years. She has translated three books of David Albahari's writing: Words Are Something Else, which was awarded the AATSEEL Award in 1998 for best translation from a Slavic or East European language, Gotz and Meyer which was awarded the National Translation Award by the American Literary Translation Association in 2006 and Snow Man. She has also written a study on poet Tin Ujevic and his work as a literary translator.

Judges

  • Boyd Tonkin

    Senior Writer and Columnist

About the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2013

The annual Prize honoured the best work of fiction by a living author, which was translated into English from any other language and published in the United Kingdom in the previous year. Uniquely, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize gave the winning author and translator equal status - each received £5,000 - recognising the importance of the translator in their ability to bridge the gap between languages and culture.


First awarded in 1990 to Orhan Pamuk and translator Victoria Holbrook for The White Castle, the IFFP ran until 1995. It was then revived in 2001 with the support of Arts Council England and has been managed by Book Trust for the last five years. The 2015 winner was The End of Days by Jenny Erpenbeck, translated from the German by Susan Bernofsy and published by Portobello Books.